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USF 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog - Pages 45-46

Procedures for Alleged Academic Dishonesty or Disruption Of Academic Process

Alleged violations of academic dishonesty or alleged disruptions of academic process will be handled initially by the instructor, who will discuss the incident with the student. It must be noted that the Faculty Senate considers the traditional relationship between student and faculty member as the primary means of settling disputes that may arise. If the instructor observes the alleged dishonesty occurring during an examination, he/she should, with discretion, notify the student of the fact before the student leaves the examination. In all cases, the instructor must attempt to schedule a meeting with the student to discuss the alleged dishonesty or disruptions.

After the discussion, if the student and instructor have reached a mutual agreement as to the solution, the instructor shall file a statement with the chairperson of the department or equivalent, e.g. campus dean, responsible for the course outlining the facts of the incident and the agreed-upon solution signed by both the instructor and student. A copy of this statement shall be given to the student. If no solution is reached, the matter should be referred to the chairperson of the department or the equivalent, e.g. campus dean, for attempt at resolution.

Academic Dishonesty

Students attending USF are awarded degrees in recognition of successful completion of coursework in their chosen fields of study. Each individual is expected to earn his/her degree on the basis of personal effort. Consequently, any form of cheating on examinations or plagiarism on assigned papers constitutes unacceptable deceit and dishonesty. Disruption of the classroom or teaching environment is also unacceptable. This cannot be tolerated in the University community and will be punishable, according to the seriousness of the offense, in conformity with this rule.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is defined as “literary theft” and consists of the unattributed quotation of the exact words of a published text, or the unattributed borrowing of original ideas by paraphrase from a published text. On written papers for which the student employs information gathered from books, articles, web sites, or oral sources, each direct quotation, as well as ideas and facts that are not generally known to the public at large, or the form, structure, or style of a secondary source must be attributed to its author by means of the appropriate citation procedure. Only widely known facts and first-hand thoughts and observations original to the student do not require citations. Citations may be made in footnotes or within the body of the text. Plagiarism also consists of passing off as one’s own segments or the total of another person’s work.

  1. Examples of proper citation (footnote format) are as follows [Footnoting/citation styles will depend upon those used by different academic disciplines. Many disciplines in the Natural Science areas, for example, will cite the sources within the body of the text.]
    1. “Plagiarism, from a Latin word meaning ‘kidnapping,’ ranges from inept paraphrasing to outright theft.” 1[Direct quotation] 1Harry Shaw, Concise Dictionary of Literary Terms (McGraw-Hill, 1972), pp. 209-210.
    2. As Harry Shaw states in his Concise Dictionary of Literary Terms, “Plagiarism, from a Latin word meaning ‘kidnapping,’ ranges from inept paraphrasing to outright theft.” 1[Direct quotation with an introductory statement citing the source.] 1(McGraw-Hill, 1972), pp. 209-210.
    3. Plagiarism is literary theft. To emphasize that point, Harry Shaw states that the root of the word comes from the Latin word meaning “kidnapping.” 1[Paraphrasing] 1Concise Dictionary of Literary Terms (McGraw-Hill, 1972), pp. 209-210.
    4. In defining plagiarism, “Strategies for Teaching with Online Tools” suggests that visibility makes intellectual theft less probable. 1[Paraphrasing a Web site] 1http://bedfordstmartins.com/technotes/hccworkshop/plagiarism.htm

  2. Examples of proper citation (in body of text):
    1. Shaw (1972) states that the root of the word comes from the Latin word meaning “kidnapping.” [Paraphrasing; complete information about source will be cited in a section at the close of the text.]
    2. Shaw (1972) was correct when he stated that “plagiarism, from a Latin word meaning ‘kidnapping,’ ranges from inept paraphrasing to outright theft.” [Quotation; complete information about source will be cited in a section at the close of the text.]
    3. Plagiarism.org suggests that a searchable database of papers might assuage what Shaw called a “kidnapping” of intellectual content. [Paraphrasing of a Web site; the complete information on the Web site will appear in the works cited section.]

  3. The following are examples of plagiarism because sources are not cited and appropriate quotation marks are not used:
    1. Plagiarism, from a Latin word meaning “kidnapping,” ranges from inept paraphrasing to outright theft.
    2. Plagiarism comes from a Latin word meaning “kidnapping” and ranges from paraphrasing to theft.
    3. Plagiarism ranges from inept paraphrasing to outright theft.
    4. Visibility online makes plagiarism much more difficult for the would-be thief.

Punishment Guidelines for Plagiarism:

The student who submitted the subject paper, lab report, etc., shall receive an “F” with a numerical value of zero on the item submitted, and the “F” shall be used to determine the final course grade. It is the option of the instructor to assign the student a grade of F or FF (the latter indicating dishonesty) in the course.

Cheating

Cheating is defined as follows: (a) the unauthorized granting or receiving of aid during the prescribed period of a course-graded exercise: students may not consult written materials such as notes or books, may not look at the paper of another student, nor consult orally with any other student taking the same test; (b) asking another person to take an examination in his/her place; (c) taking an examination for or in place of another student; (d) stealing visual concepts, such as drawings, sketches, diagrams, musical programs and scores, graphs, maps, etc., and presenting them as one’s own; (e) stealing, borrowing, buying, or disseminating tests, answer keys or other examination material except as officially authorized, research papers, creative papers, speeches, other graded assignments, etc. (f) Stealing or copying of computer programs and presenting them as one’s own. Such stealing includes the use of another student’s program, as obtained from the magnetic media or interactive terminals or from cards, print-out paper, etc.

Penalties for Academic Dishonesty:

Penalties for academic dishonesty will depend on the seriousness of the offense and may include assignment of an “F” or a numerical value of zero on the subject paper, lab report, etc., an “F” or an “FF” grade (the latter indicating academic dishonesty) in the course, suspension or expulsion from the University. A student who receives an “FF” grade may not use the university’s Grade Forgiveness Policy if the course is subsequently repeated. An “FF” grade assigned to indicate academic dishonesty is reflected only on internal records and prevents the student from repeating the course using the Grade Forgiveness Policy. If a student who has been accused of academic dishonesty drops the course, the student’s registration in the course may be reinstated until the issue is resolved. (NOTE: A student who is suspected of cheating may not drop a course to avoid a penalty. If the student drops a course after having cheated the university may reinstate him or her until the case is adjudicated and, if appropriate, the penalty determined. However, even if the student is not reinstated in the course, disciplinary action may be pursued if cheating is suspected and the “W” grade may be changed to an FF, F, or other grade depending on the ultimate resolution of the disciplinary process. This includes any instance of cheating that is not detected by the instructor until after the student has dropped the course. The ultimate penalty may be an FF or an F in the course, or other action.) Procedures for student notification and the option of appeal concerning the academic dishonesty remain with the instructor and/or department chair. (See Procedures for Alleged Academic Dishonesty or Disruption of Academic Process.) Notice that a student has been dismissed for reasons of academic dishonesty will be reflected on the student’s transcript with the formal notation: Dismissed for Academic Dishonesty.

For the first “FF” recorded in a student’s USF academic record, the student will receive a letter from the Dean of Undergraduate Studies informing him or her of being placed on “Academic Dishonesty Warning” for the remainder of enrollment at USF and of appeal rights for the “FF” grade. Students with any “FF” grade on record will not be eligible for honors at graduation.

For the second “FF” recorded, the student will be suspended for one full semester and readmitted only after writing a clear statement indicating remorse, understanding of the seriousness of the offense, and understanding of the importance of integrity in all areas, including academic work. A letter informing him or her of this action and appeal rights will be sent from the Dean of Undergraduate Studies.

For the third “FF” recorded, the student will be permanently dismissed from the university for violations of academic integrity and with notice of that dismissal as a part of the formal record and transcript.

Note that the maximum penalty for receipt of any “FF” grade may be permanent dismissal from the university for violations of academic integrity and with a notice of that dismissal as a part of the student’s formal record and transcript.

The following penalties are generally assigned in cases when the maximum penalty is not appropriate.

  1. For observation of or exchanging test information with other students during the course of a classroom test, the students who receive or give such information may receive an “F” with a numerical value of zero on the test, and the “F” shall be used to determine the final course grade. It is the option of the instructor to fail the student in the course and assign and “F” or “FF” grade for the course.

  2. For the use of any prohibited device, such as a cheat sheet, recording, calculator if forbidden on exam, etc., during the course of a classroom test to assist the student or other students, the student using such prohibited device may receive an “F” or “FF” in the course.

  3. For the use of another student, a stand-in, to take an examination for the enrolled student, it is suggested that the enrolled student receive an “F” or “FF” in the course and be suspended from school for one year and that the stand-in, if a University student, be suspended from school for one year.

  4. For stealing, borrowing, or buying of research papers, creative works, speeches or tests and other exam materials, or other graded assignments, or the dissemination of such materials, or the manipulation of recorded grades in a grade book or other class records, the student, if enrolled in the course, may receive an “F” or “FF” in the course and may be expelled from the University.

  5. It is suggested that students who plagiarize or receive or give stolen computer programs receive an “F” with a numerical value of zero on the assignment, program or programs, and the “F” be used to determine the final course grade. It is the option of the instructor to fail the student in the course and assign and “F” or “FF” grade for the course.

Disruption of Academic Process

Disruption of academic process is defined as the act or words of a student in a classroom or teaching environment which in the reasonable estimation of a faculty member: (a) directs attention from the academic matters at hand, such as noisy distractions; persistent, disrespectful or abusive interruptions of lecture, exam or academic discussions, or (b) presents a danger to the health, safety or well being of the faculty member or students.

Punishment Guidelines for Disruption of Academic Process:
Punishments for disruption of academic process will depend on the seriousness of the disruption and will range from a private verbal reprimand to dismissal from class with a final grade of “W,” if the student is passing the course, shown on the student record. If the student is not passing, a grade of “F” will be shown on the student record. Particularly serious instances of disruption or the academic process may result in suspension or permanent expulsion from the University.

Hearings

Emergency Hearings. An expedited emergency hearing may be held before an academic administrator appointed by the dean or by the appointed academic committee in cases that involve the safety, health or welfare of any student or staff member.


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Office of Undergraduate Studies
Effective Date: Semester I, 2006

http://www.ugs.usf.edu/catalogs/0607/adadap.htm