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USF 2006-2007 Undergraduate Catalog - USF St. Petersburg - Pages 266-274

Grades, Scholarship Requirements, and Review Procedures

The University is interested in each student making reasonable progress towards his/her educational goals and will aid each student through guidance and faculty advising. To make students aware of their academic progress, the University has enacted a system of grading and policies of Academic Probation and Academic Dismissal that indicates whether or not a student is showing sufficient progress toward meeting degree requirements. Notations of Grades, Academic Probation and Academic Dismissal are posted to the student’s academic record.

When a student is academically dismissed from the University and is ineligible to re-enroll, it may be in his/her best interest to re-evaluate his/her educational goals with an academic advisor at the college. If the student’s poor academic performance has resulted from extenuating circumstances or if after a period of time the student feels he/she has gained adequate maturity and motivation, he/she may petition the Academic Regulations Committee for permission to re-enroll. See Academic Regulations Committee, for information on petitioning.

Academic Dismissal may have additional implications for a student receiving financial aid. If required, a student may need to complete the Satisfactory Progress for Financial Aid Recipients Petition. For more information, see http://usfweb2.usf.edu/finaid/nonyear/satisfactory_progress.htm.

Grading System

Effective Fall Semester, 2000, USF St. Petersburg faculty may use a plus/minus grading system to assign student grades. The use of the plus/minus grading system is at the discretion of the individual faculty member.

A student’s measure of academic achievement is recorded on the academic record based on the following grading system:

Plus/Minus Grades

A+   4.00
A Excellent performance 4.00
A-   3.67
B+   3.33
B Good performance 3.00
B-   2.67
C+   2.33
C Average performance 2.00
C-   1.67
D+   1.33
D Poor performance 1.00
D-   0.67
F Failure 0.00

Other Grades

E Course repeated, not included in GPA
FF Failure/academic dishonesty
I Incomplete
IF Incomplete grade changed to Failure
IU Incomplete grade changed to Unsatisfactory
M No grade submitted by instructor
MF Missing grade changed to Failure
MU Missing grade changed to Unsatisfactory
N Audit
S Satisfactory
U Unsatisfactory
W Withdrawal from course without penalty
WC Withdrawal for extenuating circumstances
Z Indicates continuing registration.

Please note that the grade of C- will satisfy specified minimum requirements of the Gordon Rule courses and the common prerequisites unless otherwise specified in the Catalog.

Grade Point Average

The University uses the quality points listed above. The grade-point average (GPA) is computed by dividing the total number of quality points by the total hours attempted at USF. The total quality points are figured by multiplying the number of credits assigned to each course by the quality point value of the grade given. Credit hours for courses with grades of I, IU, M, MU, N, S, U, W, Z, and grades that are preceded by a “E” are subtracted from the total hours attempted before the GPA is calculated.

Credit hours for repeated USF coursework will be awarded only once per course unless the course is a university-approved repeatable course. “D” and “F” grades, however, for repeated USF coursework will be counted in the computation of the student’s GPA as many times as those grades for that course are recorded. If a student originally earns a “C” or higher in a course that may not be repeated for additional credit and earns a “C” or higher on a subsequent enrollment the new grade is not computed in the USF GPA unless the forgiveness policy is being applied.

“I” Grade Policy

An “I” grade indicates incomplete coursework and may be awarded to graduate and undergraduate students. (Undergraduate rules apply to non-degree-seeking students.) It may be awarded to an undergraduate student only when a small portion of the student’s work is incomplete and only when the student is otherwise earning a passing grade. Until removed, the “I” is not computed in the GPA for either undergraduate or graduate students. The time limit for removing the “I” is to be set by the instructor of the course. For undergraduate students, this time limit may not exceed two academic semesters, whether or not the student is in residence, and/or graduation, whichever comes first. “I” grades not removed by the end of the time limit will be changed to “IF” or “IU,” whichever is appropriate. Whether or not the student is in residence, any change to “IF” grades will be calculated in the cumulative GPA and, if applicable, the student will be placed on appropriate probation or academically dismissed. Students are not required to re-register for courses in which they are only completing previous course requirements to change an “I” grade. However, if a student wants to audit a course for review in order to complete course requirements, full fees must be paid.

“M” Grade Policy

An “M” is automatically assigned as a default grade when the instructor does not submit any grade for an undergraduate student. (Undergraduate rules also apply to non-degree-seeking students.) Until removed, the “M” is not computed in the GPA. The time limit for removing the “M” may not exceed one academic semester (whether or not the student is enrolled) and/or graduation, whichever comes first. “M” grades that are not removed by the end of the next semester/term will be changed to “MF” or “MU,” whichever is appropriate. Whether or not the student is enrolled, any change to “MF” grades will be computed in the cumulative GPA, and, if applicable, the student will be placed on appropriate probation or academically dismissed.

S/U Grade System

No-option Courses. Certain courses have been designated as S/U courses. The “S” and “U” grades are used to indicate the student’s final grade. These S/U only courses are identified with (S/U only) after the course definition in this catalog. No grading system option is available to students or faculty in these courses.

Option Courses. Any undergraduate course may be taken on an S/U basis by a student under the following conditions and restrictions:

  1. Required courses in the major may not be taken on an S/U basis.
  2. Specifically designated required courses in the distribution requirements of the student’s college may not be taken on an S/U basis.
  3. Courses to satisfy 6A-10.30 (Gordon Rule) may not be taken on an S/U basis.
  4. Courses to satisfy USF’s B.A. foreign language requirement may not be taken on an S/U basis.
  5. All elective courses for the major and all elective courses in the distribution requirements, and all other free elective courses may be taken on an S/U basis except where:
    1. The certifying college restricts the number of courses that may be taken on an S/U basis in any one or all of the above areas or restricts the total number of S/U courses that can be accepted for all of the above areas.
    2. The certifying college specifies that certain courses may not be taken on an S/U basis.
    3. The instructor of a course refuses to allow the course to be taken on an S/U basis.

Mechanism for Assigning S/U Grades. The method by which a student receives an “S” or “U” grade in an option course will consist of the following:

  1. A written agreement signed by both instructor and student shall be filed with such offices as may be designated by the college. The college shall set the deadline (no later than the last day of classes for the term) for the student to decide if he/she wishes to take the course on an S/U basis.
  2. The instructor shall assign final letter grades A, B, C, D, F, or I, but will transmit to the Registrar “S” or “U” consistent with the following:
    1. Letter grade, A, B, or C, shall be equivalent to a letter grade of “S.”
    2. Letter grades D or F shall be equivalent to a letter grade of “U.” “S” and “U” grades are not computed in the student’s GPA.

Grade Forgiveness Policy

USF St. Petersburg’s forgiveness policy permits an undergraduate to repeat a course and have the repeated grade computed in his/her GPA in place of the original grade, providing the repeat grade is “D” or higher (exception - see Honors at Graduation). A course that is repeated and the repeat grade is “F” will have both grades calculated into the GPA. Normally, grade forgiveness may only be applied to a specific course that a student chooses to repeat. No course taken on the S/U grade basis may have the grade forgiveness applied. Under unusual circumstances, a different but similar course may be used if the substitute course has been previously approved by the college dean and is on file in the Office of Admissions & Records.

The grade forgiveness policy cannot apply to any course in which the grade of “FF” has been recorded.

Any undergraduate or non-degree-seeking student who wishes to implement grade forgiveness must:

  1. Complete a “Grade Forgiveness Request Form” (available in the Office of Admissions & Records) for each course to be repeated.
  2. Adhere to the following conditions:
    1. A limitation of applying grade forgiveness to three USF courses with no more than one repeat per course.
    2. With prior approval of the college dean, a course different from a course on the approved list may be substituted in the following cases:
      1. The substitute course is a change in prefix, number, hours, or title, but not a substantive change in content from the original course.
      2. The substitute course replaces a course no longer offered by the institution.
    3. The repeated course must be taken under the standard grading system (A-F) and the latest grade must be D/D- or higher (grades of S/U are not permitted).
    4. All grades remain on the transcript. The original course grade will be annotated with “E” to indicate that the course has subsequently been repeated and the original grade is not computed in the GPA.
    5. Individual colleges may have further restrictions; therefore, the student should consult with his/her college.

This policy is applicable to undergraduate and non-degree-seeking students only, and applies to 1000-to-5000-level courses. Once students have been awarded a bachelor’s degree from USF, they may not repeat a course and be forgiven the original grade, taken prior to graduation.

The policy applies only to courses taken originally at USF and repeated at USF.

Good Standing

USF St. Petersburg students will be considered in good standing if they are currently enrolled or eligible to return to USF St. Petersburg.

Academic Record

The student’s academic record shall not be changed after the student has graduated.

Academic Probation and Academic Dismissal for Undergraduate Students

The first time the academic record of an undergraduate or non-degree-seeking student falls below a cumulative 2.00 grade-point average (GPA), counting only USF grades, he/she will be placed on Academic Probation (AP). If the cumulative GPA is not raised to 2.00 or higher at the end of the next term of enrollment, the student will be placed on Final Academic Probation (FP). A student on Final Academic Probation who fails to raise his/her cumulative USF GPA to 2.00 or higher at the end of the next term of enrollment will be Academically Dismissed (AD) from the university.

A student admitted to the university on probationary status will be placed on Academic Probation (AP) his/her first term with the above rules related to Final Academic Probation and Academic Dismissal applying. Academic advising prior to registration is mandatory until the student is removed from probationary status.

Any student who withdraws after the fifth day of classes while on Academic Probation will be placed on Final Academic Probation. Any student who withdraws after the fifth day of classes while on Final Academic Probation or who has been placed on Conditional Readmission by the Academic Regulations Committee will be Academically Dismissed.

The determination and notification of probationary status or academic dismissal will be made by the Office of Admissions & Records on the student’s academic record.

A student who attends another college or university during academic dismissal will be classified as a transfer student and readmission will be based on the total record accumulated from all colleges and universities attended.

If a student who has accumulated fewer than 60 semester hours is academically dismissed from USF or falls below a 2.0 GPA and subsequently achieves an A.A. degree or an articulated A.S. degree from a Florida public community/ junior college (or other SUS institution), that student, when returning to the University, will be automatically credited with a maximum of 60 semester hours and have his/her academic record cleared and the USF GPA will begin again.

If a student who has accumulated 60 or more semester hours is academically dismissed from USF falls below a 2.0 GPA and subsequently receives an A.A. or an articulated A.S. from a Florida public community/junior college (or other SUS institution), that student, when returning to the University, will not automatically have his/her record cleared. The student must consult with his/her Academic Regulations Committee representative and must either:

  1. Request that his/her academic record be cleared. If the student chooses this option and the Academic Regulations Committee approves the request, the student will be credited with a maximum of 60 semester hours and the USF GPA will begin again; or

  2. Request that the USF hours and GPA be retained and receive specific stipulations from the Academic Regulations Committee to clear the academic record.

In either case, the decision must be made in the term of USF St. Petersburg enrollment following the receipt of the A.A. degree and is considered to be a binding decision.

If a student is academically dismissed or falls below a 2.0 GPA from USF and subsequently receives a BA/BS from another four-year institution, that student, when accepted to the University with the post-baccalaureate status, will have his/her academic record cleared.

The posting of the A.A. shall not remove the previous GPA generated at USF for a student who has earned credit at USF and is academically eligible to return to the University and who subsequently receives an A.A. from a community college.

Academic Renewal

USF recognizes that not every student's academic record is flawless and that many times students get off to such a poor start that their future academic opportunities are limited. USF can offer many of those students a second chance. The University's Academic Renewal policy allows students, who provide evidence that they might now achieve academic success, to renew their pursuit of baccalaureate degrees without the responsibility of having to overcome the entire burden of low grades and low grade-point-averages that reflect academic work attempted in the past. To facilitate this opportunity, students who qualify for Academic Renewal may, with the approval of the Academic Regulations Committee, have portions of their academic record not counted in the determination of their grade point averages (GPAs) for graduation purposes. Their entire academic record, however, will continue to be reflected on their transcripts even though a selected portion will not be counted in their GPAs. Academic Renewal will only be applied to a student's academic record one time at USF.

Academic Renewal I applies to students who were academically dismissed or on formal academic probationary status (institutional cumulative GPA of less than 2.00) with fewer than 60 credits but who otherwise were eligible to return to USF or other institutions of higher education prior to their successful completion of 60 transferable credits. They may be admitted to the University with Academic Renewal I after completing all requirements for the Associate in Arts degree or equivalent (including general education, Gordon Rule and CLAST requirements) at a two-or four-year college. Academic Renewal I students will enter USF as juniors and their USF grade point average will be calculated from that point forward. Such students will be required to earn 60 unduplicated degree credits from USF, with a grade point average of at least 2.00 subsequent to the AA degree, in order to graduate from USF. They also may be excluded from admission to limited access programs. Further, students who exercise the Academic Renewal policy will not be considered for University Honors at graduation unless they meet the criteria using all grades earned.

Academic Renewal II applies to students who were academically dismissed or on formal academic probationary status (institutional cumulative GPA of less than 2.00) with 60 or more earned credits but who otherwise were eligible to return to USF or other institutions of higher education after the successful completion of 60 transferable credits. These students may be admitted to the University with Academic Renewal II if they are able to provide convincing evidence of changes that indicate they might be successful given a new opportunity. Normally, such students will have been engaged in successful non-academic activities such as work or the military for approximately five years or will have demonstrated more recent academic success through completion of an associates degree or certificate at another institution. Academic Renewal II students will be offered an opportunity to enter USF with all coursework and grades from up to three academic semesters (or equivalent) prior to their academic dismissal or probation from USF to be dropped from consideration in grade-point-average calculations at the University. Determination of which semester(s) may be dropped (up to three) is determined by the student through consultation with the college Academic Regulations Committee representative. Students utilizing the Academic Renewal II policy must earn a cumulative GPA of 2.00 in USF coursework attempted subsequent to Academic Renewal II, in order to graduate. Students who elect to exercise the Academic Renewal policy will not be allowed to use any credit earned during the academic terms from which courses are dropped from grade-point-average consideration toward meeting degree requirements at the University* and they may be excluded from admission to limited access programs. Further, students who exercise the Academic Renewal policy will not be considered for University Honors at graduation unless they meet the criteria using all grades earned.

*Students who engage the Academic Renewal II policy will lose the credit they earned during the terms (up to three) they choose to exclude from GPA calculations. They will not necessarily have to repeat a course completed with a grade of “C” or higher to meet specific course requirements.

College Policies For Academic Progress

Colleges may determine and implement standards of academic progress for undergraduate students (majors in the college) in addition to those established by USF St. Petersburg. Students who do not meet the academic standards of progress set by their colleges will be placed on probation and may be disenrolled. The college dean is responsible for implementing standards of academic progress and for notifying students of their probationary or disenrollment status.

Colleges may restrict the course selections and the number of hours a student may take that do not apply toward completion of degree requirements. Students who exceed this limit may have part or all of their registration canceled.

Colleges are responsible for publicizing and students are responsible for knowing their college’s policies for academic progress.

Class Standing

A student’s class is determined by the number of credits he/she has earned without relation to his/her GPA.
0C Unclassified Non-degree-seeking students
1F Freshman 0 through 29 semester hours passed
2S Sophomore 30 through 59 semester hours passed
3J Junior 60 through 89 semester hours passed
4R Senior 90 or more semester hours passed; however, no baccalaureate degree earned here or elsewhere
5B Baccalaureate degree-holder working on a second undergraduate program or degree
6M Graduate student admitted to Master’s Degree Program
6A Graduate student admitted to Specialist Degree Program
6C Admitted to Candidacy
6D Graduate student admitted to a Doctoral Degree Program
7A-7D 1st-4th year professional program (M.D.) or post-doctoral status

Declaration of Major

First-year students often enter the university undecided about their career plans and intended majors and that usually creates little difficulty for them. Many of the more than 24 undergraduate majors at USFSP allow students considerable options in their early course choices. Conversely, many other majors, and often the most popular majors, require completion of particular courses within the first two years. In fields, such as education, business, and graphic design students must satisfy state mandated course prerequisites and complete specific general education courses during the first two years to be admitted to those major as juniors and to allow graduation on a timely basis.

It clearly is advantageous for students to make early decisions about their majors to be on track and to remain on-track toward their degrees and to graduate in a timely manner. Students are urged to declare a major upon entry to the university. If they are unable to formally choose or declare a major or a pre-major they should follow the multi-semester inquiry-based (for undecided) curriculums that best matches their interests.

All students must be officially declared in a major or a pre-major before they register for more than 36 credits. Beginning Fall Semester 2005, FTIC students who will have completed 36 or more credits at the end of the term in which they are enrolled will not be allowed to register for further credit coursework at the university until they have declared a major or pre-major.

Transfer students, especially those who have completed 60 hours of work prior to transferring to USF, should declare their majors upon entry to the university. Transfer students who have not declared a major (or pre-major) and who have completed 75 or more credits of college coursework will not be allowed to register for further credit coursework at the university until they have declared a major or a pre-major. Students transferring in 75 or more credits will be required to declare a major (or pre-major) at the time of admission.

Many resources are made available by the university to assist students in making career decisions and choosing their majors. Information about these resources is readily available from academic advisors. All entering FTIC students who have not made a career/major decision upon entry to the university will be required to follow one of the multi-semester inquiry-based (for undecided) curriculums offered by the university and enroll in the University Experience or Career Development Process course.

Change of Major

All undergraduate students desiring to change their major should consult the Academic Advising Center.

Administrative Holds

A student may be placed on administrative hold by failure to meet obligations to the University. When a student is on administrative hold, he/she may not be allowed to register, receive a diploma, or receive a transcript. Settlement of financial accounts must be made at the University Cashier’s Office. Each student placed on administrative hold should determine from the Office of the Registrar which office placed him/her in this status and clear the obligation with that respective office.

Student Information Changes

Notifications regarding changes of address, name, residency, and citizenship should be filed promptly with the Office of Admissions & Records.

Final Examinations

Examinations in academic subjects are, for most courses, an integral part of the learning process and one part of a procedure for evaluating student performance and determining grades. USF St. Petersburg requires certain standards for the examination process in order to protect the academic integrity of courses and the best interests of both the student and the instructor.

Testing in General: In each academic course, the student is expected to undergo a meaningful testing and evaluation that will reveal the student’s intellectual growth in the subject matter covered or otherwise reflect the achievement of the course objectives.

The instructor has the responsibility of maintaining a fair and impartial testing and examination procedure, has the right to define and structure the testing process, and shall not be restricted as to form, style or content of the examination. It is the policy of USF St. Petersburg that all students facing an examination (of any type) shall have equal advance notice of the form and content of that examination. The University regards the routine use of all or part of the same formal examination for successive academic terms as unsound policy except when used with adequate safeguards such as a random selection of questions from a large pool.

Comprehensive Final Examinations: The last 6 days of the Fall and Spring semesters shall be set aside for final examinations, and any comprehensive final examination must be given during this designated period. If a segment examination is given in lieu of a comprehensive examination, the segment examination must be given in the period designated during final examination week. The period of two hours shall be allotted for each final examination. If a student has a direct conflict of scheduled examinations or has three or more examinations scheduled on the same day, the student may petition the appropriate instructor to reschedule one of the student’s examinations. The final examination schedule shall be published in the same manner and place as the Schedule of Classes.

Regional Chancellor's Scholar List

Full-time undergraduate students who demonstrate superior academic achievement during one semester will be honored on a “Regional Chancellor's Scholar List.” To be eligible for the Regional Chancellor's Scholar List, a student must be in a “pool” (defined hereafter) and must complete 12 hours of graded (A-F) USF courses with no incomplete grades during the semester. The “pool” consists of all students who have registered for at least 12 hours of USF courses in a given semester. The Regional Chancellor's Scholar List shall consist of the fewer of: 1) the upper 10% of the enrollment of the college or 2) students in the college with a USF St. Petersburg 4.0 GPA (ties at the 90th percentile will be included in the honors group).

Dean’s List

Full-time undergraduate students who demonstrate superior academic achievement during one semester will be honored on a “Dean’s List.” To be eligible for the Dean’s List, a student must be in a “pool” (defined hereafter) and must complete 12 hours of graded (A-F) USF courses with no incomplete grades during the semester. The “pool” consists of all students who have registered for at least 12 hours of USF courses in a given semester. The Dean’s List shall consist of the fewer of: 1) the upper 10% of the enrollment of the college or 2) students in the college with a USF St. Petersburg 3.9-3.75 GPA (ties at the 90th percentile will be included in the honors group).

Academic Regulations Committee

The St. Petersburg Academic Regulations Committee (SPARC) meets regularly to review petitions submitted by undergraduate students to waive University academic regulations. Students must petition and secure approval of the committee to return to the University after having been academically dismissed or to waive academic deadlines.

Effective Fall 1998, the University has implemented a statute of limitations on student petitions for retroactive adds, drops, withdrawals, and registration. A student will be limited to two calendar years (six academic semesters/terms) for such appeals whether the student is in attendance or not.

The committee normally meets once a week on Thursday. To petition the committee, a student must secure the appropriate form from the Academic Advising Center and consult with the ARC representative from his/her college prior to submitting the petition form. Completed forms should be returned to the Academic Advising Center no later than the preceding Friday, to be reviewed at the next week’s meeting. Students will receive notification of the committee’s action the following week.

Student Academic Grievance Procedures

  1. Purpose - The purpose of these procedures is to provide all undergraduate and graduate students taking courses within the University of South Florida an opportunity for objective review of facts and events pertinent to the cause of the academic grievance. Such review will be accomplished in a collegial, non-judicial atmosphere rather than an adversarial one, and shall allow the parties involved to participate. All parties will be expected to act in a professional and civil manner.

    The procedures that follow are designed to ensure objective and fair treatment of both students and instructors. These guidelines are meant to govern all Colleges (exclusive of the College of Medicine which maintains its own procedures); however, as individual Colleges or campuses may have different levels of authority or titles, each student must obtain the specific designations used by each college or campus for levels of authority and titles in the process.

    In the case of grade appeals, the University reserves the right to change a student’s grade if it is determined at the conclusion of the grievance process that the grade given was incorrect. In such circumstances the Dean or Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs or the Vice President for Health Sciences Center may file an administrative grade change. The term “incorrect” means the assigned grade was based on something other than performance in the course, or that the assignment of the grade was not consistent with the criteria for awarding of grades as described in the course syllabus or other materials distributed to the student. In the case of all other academic grievances the University reserves the right to determine the final outcome based on the procedures detailed herein.

  2. Terms and Guidelines - An “academic grievance” is a claim that a specific academic decision or action that affects that student’s academic record or status has violated published policies and procedures, or has been applied to the grievant in a manner different from that used for other students. Grievances may relate to such decisions as the assignment of a grade seen by the student as incorrect or the dismissal or failure of a student for his or her action(s). Academic grievances will not deal with general student complaints.

    “Instructor” shall mean any classroom instructor, thesis/dissertation/directed study supervisor, committee member or chair, or counselor/advisor who interacts with the student in an academic environment.

    “Department Chair/Director” shall mean the academic head of a college department or the director of a program—or in all cases a “Department’s designee” appointed to handle academic grievances.

    “Dean” shall mean a College Dean, the Dean of Undergraduate Studies, or the Dean of Graduate Studies, as indicated—or in all cases a “Dean’s designee” appointed to handle academic grievances for the unit.

    “Time” shall mean “academic time,” that is, periods when university classes are in session. The person vested with authority at the appropriate level may extend any of the time periods contained herein for good cause. Any extensions must be communicated in writing to all parties. For the purposes of this policy, each step shall be afforded three (3) weeks as a standard time limit. When a department considers a grievance according to published departmental procedures approved by the College Dean and Provost, the time line specified in this academic unit’s procedures will govern the process and no additional notice of time extension is needed. “Written communication” shall mean communication by hard copy to the recipient’s address of record.

    The “burden of proof” shall be upon the student such that the student challenging the decision, action or grade assigned has the burden of supplying evidence that proves that the instructor’s decision was incorrect. In considering grievances, decisions will be based on the preponderance of the evidence.

    Neither party shall be entitled to bring “legal representation” to any actual grievance proceeding as this is an internal review of an academic decision.

    As some Colleges may not have departments or some campuses may use different titles, the next level that applies to that College shall be substituted. If the incident giving rise to a grievance occurs on the St. Petersburg campus, the approved policy on that campus shall govern.

  3. Resolution at the Department Level

    1. The student shall first make a reasonable effort to resolve his or her grievance with the instructor concerned, with the date of the incident triggering the start of the process (i.e., the issuance of a grade; the receipt of an assignment), and the instructor shall accommodate a reasonable request to discuss and attempt to resolve this issue.

    2. If the situation cannot be resolved or the instructor is not available, the student shall file a notification letter within three weeks of the triggering incident to the department Chairperson/Director. This shall be a concise written statement of particulars and must include information pertaining to how, in the student’s opinion, University policies or procedures were violated. The department Chairperson/Director shall provide a copy of this statement to the instructor.

    3. The department Chairperson/Director shall discuss the statement jointly or individually with the student and the instructor to see if the grievance can be resolved. If the department maintains its own grievance procedure,* it should be applied at this point. If the grievance can be resolved, the Chairperson/Director shall provide a statement to that effect to the student and the instructor with a copy to the College Dean.

    4. If the grievance cannot be resolved, the department Chair/Director shall notify both the student and the instructor, informing the student of his/her right to file a written request within three weeks to advance the grievance to the College Level. The instructor may file a written response to the grievance petition. Upon receipt of the student’s request to move the process to the College Level and the instructor’s response to the grievance (if provided), the Chairperson/Director shall immediately notify the College Dean of the grievance, providing copies of the student’s initiating grievance statement, any instructor’s written response to the grievance, and the written request from the student to have the process advanced to the College Level. Should the student not file a written request to move the grievance to the College Level within the prescribed time, the grievance will end.

    If the grievance concerns the Chairperson/Director or other officials of the department, the student has a right to bypass the departmental process and proceed directly to the College Level.

  4. Resolution at the College Level

    1. Upon receipt of the grievance, the College Dean shall either determine that the matter is not an academic grievance and dismiss it or within three weeks shall establish an Academic Grievance Committee. The membership of the Committee shall be constituted as follows:

      1. Three (3) faculty members and two (2) students (undergraduate or graduate as appropriate to the case) shall be selected from the college by the Dean.

      2. Wherever practical, the Committee shall include neither members of the faculty nor students of the department directly involved with the grievance, nor faculty nor students of the student’s major department. However, if requested by the department, committee, or participants, faculty or students from the department involved with the grievance or from the student’s major department may provide expert or other relevant testimony in the proceedings.

    2. The Committee will operate in the following manner;

      1. The Committee Chairperson will be appointed by the College Dean from among the three faculty members appointed to the Committee.

      2. The Committee Chairperson shall be responsible for scheduling meetings, overseeing the deliberations of the committee and ensuring that full and fair consideration is provided to all parties. The Committee Chairperson shall vote on committee decisions only when required to break a tie.

      3. All deliberations shall be in private and held confidential by all members of the Committee and those involved in the proceedings. The recommendation of the Committee shall be based on the factual evidence presented to it.

      4. Within three weeks of the Committee appointment, the Committee Chairperson shall deliver in writing to the student, instructor, department Chairperson/Director or Program Director, and College Dean a report of the findings and a recommended resolution.

      5. Within three weeks of receipt of the Committee recommendation, the College Dean shall provide a decision in writing to all parties.

      6. The student or the instructor may appeal the decision of the College Dean to the University Level only if the decision of the College Dean is contrary to the recommendation of the Committee or if there is a procedural violation of these Student Academic Grievance Procedures. Such an appeal must be made in writing to the Dean of Undergraduate Studies or Graduate Studies (as appropriate) within three weeks of receipt of the decision from the College Dean. Otherwise, the College Dean’s decision is final and not subject to further appeal within the University.

  5. Resolution at the University Level:

    The Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs or the Vice President for the Health Sciences Center has delegated authority to the Dean of Undergraduate Studies to act in place of the Provost/Vice President in all academic grievance appeals involving undergraduate students unless the grievance occurred in a program within Undergraduate Studies, wherein it will go back to the Provost to redelegate. The Dean of Graduate Studies will act in place of the Provost/Vice President in all academic grievance appeals involving graduate students.

    1. The student or the instructor may appeal at the University Level within three weeks of the receipt of a decision made at the College Level, when (1) the decision by a College Dean is contrary to the recommendation of a college Grievance Committee, or (2) there is cause to think a procedural violation of these University Academic Grievance Procedures has been made. Within three weeks of receipt of the appeal to the decision, the Undergraduate/Graduate Dean in consultation with the Faculty Senate and the Student Senate, shall appoint an Appeals Committee consisting of three faculty members drawn from the university Undergraduate Council or Graduate Council (as appropriate), and two students, undergraduate or graduate (as appropriate).

    2. The structure, functions and operating procedures of the Appeals Committee will be the same as those of the College Committee (i.e., chaired by one of the appointed faculty members appointed by the Undergraduate/Graduate Dean who will not vote except in the case of a tie, having no representation from either party’s respective departments, developing a recommendation to the Undergraduate/Graduate Dean, etc.).

    3. Within three weeks of the appointment, the Committee Chairperson shall deliver in writing to the Undergraduate/Graduate Dean a report of the findings of the Committee and a recommended resolution.

    4. Within three weeks of receipt of the Committee recommendation, the Undergraduate/Graduate Dean shall provide a decision in writing to all parties.

    5. If the Undergraduate/Graduate Dean’s decision is that a grade change is merited, the Undergraduate/Graduate Dean shall initiate the grade change on the authority of the Provost and so inform all parties. In all academic grievance appeals, the Undergraduate/Graduate Dean’s decision is final and not subject to further appeal within the University.

    These procedures shall take effect commencing Fall Semester, 2005, and shall supercede all other academic grievance procedures currently in effect, with the exception of the procedures of the College of Medicine.

* Departments may develop their own formal procedures for considering grievances. Such procedures must be considered and approved by the College Dean and the Provost, and published on the Department’s web site. When such procedures exist, the Department’s examination of the grievance will unfold as specified in the procedures. If the Departmental process upholds the student’s grievance, the Department Chair will work with the College, the student and the instructor to remedy the situation. If the Department does not uphold the grievance, the Chair will report the fact to the Dean. The student may, in such cases, request the College Level review as outlined in these university procedures.

Procedures for Alleged Academic Dishonesty or Disruption Of Academic Process

Alleged violations of academic dishonesty or alleged disruptions of academic process will be handled initially by the instructor, who will discuss the incident with the student. It must be noted that the Faculty Senate considers the traditional relationship between student and faculty member as the primary means of settling disputes that may arise. If the instructor observes the alleged dishonesty occurring during an examination, he/she should, with discretion, notify the student of the fact before the student leaves the examination. In all cases, the instructor must attempt to schedule a meeting with the student to discuss the alleged dishonesty or disruptions.

After the discussion, if the student and instructor have reached a mutual agreement as to the solution, the instructor shall file a statement with the chairperson of the department or equivalent, e.g. campus dean, responsible for the course outlining the facts of the incident and the agreed-upon solution signed by both the instructor and student. A copy of this statement shall be given to the student. If no solution is reached, the matter should be referred to the chairperson of the department or the equivalent, e.g. campus dean, for attempt at resolution.

Academic Dishonesty
Students attending USF are awarded degrees in recognition of successful completion of coursework in their chosen fields of study. Each individual is expected to earn his/her degree on the basis of personal effort. Consequently, any form of cheating on examinations or plagiarism on assigned papers constitutes unacceptable deceit and dishonesty. Disruption of the classroom or teaching environment is also unacceptable. This cannot be tolerated in the University community and will be punishable, according to the seriousness of the offense, in conformity with this rule.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is defined as “literary theft” and consists of the unattributed quotation of the exact words of a published text, or the unattributed borrowing of original ideas by paraphrase from a published text. On written papers for which the student employs information gathered from books, articles, web sites, or oral sources, each direct quotation, as well as ideas and facts that are not generally known to the public at large, or the form, structure, or style of a secondary source must be attributed to its author by means of the appropriate citation procedure. Only widely known facts and first-hand thoughts and observations original to the student do not require citations. Citations may be made in footnotes or within the body of the text. Plagiarism also consists of passing off as one’s own segments or the total of another person’s work.

  1. Examples of proper citation (footnote format) are as follows [Footnoting/citation styles will depend upon those used by different academic disciplines. Many disciplines in the Natural Science areas, for example, will cite the sources within the body of the text.]

    1. “Plagiarism, from a Latin word meaning ‘kidnapping,’ ranges from inept paraphrasing to outright theft.” 1[Direct quotation] 1Harry Shaw, Concise Dictionary of Literary Terms (McGraw-Hill, 1972), pp. 209-210.

    2. As Harry Shaw states in his Concise Dictionary of Literary Terms, “Plagiarism, from a Latin word meaning ‘kidnapping,’ ranges from inept paraphrasing to outright theft.” 1[Direct quotation with an introductory statement citing the source.] 1(McGraw-Hill, 1972), pp. 209-210.

    3. Plagiarism is literary theft. To emphasize that point, Harry Shaw states that the root of the word comes from the Latin word meaning “kidnapping.” 1[Paraphrasing] 1Concise Dictionary of Literary Terms (McGraw-Hill, 1972), pp. 209-210.

    4. In defining plagiarism, “Strategies for Teaching with Online Tools” suggests that visibility makes intellectual theft less probable. 1[Paraphrasing a Web site] 1http://bedfordstmartins.com/technotes/hccworkshop/plagiarism.htm

  2. Examples of proper citation (in body of text):

    1. Shaw (1972) states that the root of the word comes from the Latin word meaning “kidnapping.” [Paraphrasing; complete information about source will be cited in a section at the close of the text.]

    2. Shaw (1972) was correct when he stated that “plagiarism, from a Latin word meaning ‘kidnapping,’ ranges from inept paraphrasing to outright theft.” [Quotation; complete information about source will be cited in a section at the close of the text.]

    3. Plagiarism.org suggests that a searchable database of papers might assuage what Shaw called a “kidnapping” of intellectual content. [Paraphrasing of a Web site; the complete information on the Web site will appear in the works cited section.]

  3. The following are examples of plagiarism because sources are not cited and appropriate quotation marks are not used:

    1. Plagiarism, from a Latin word meaning “kidnapping,” ranges from inept paraphrasing to outright theft.

    2. Plagiarism comes from a Latin word meaning “kidnapping” and ranges from paraphrasing to theft.

    3. Plagiarism ranges from inept paraphrasing to outright theft.

    4. Visibility online makes plagiarism much more difficult for the would-be thief.

Punishment Guidelines for Plagiarism:
The student who submitted the subject paper, lab report, etc., shall receive an “F” with a numerical value of zero on the item submitted, and the “F” shall be used to determine the final course grade. It is the option of the instructor to assign the student a grade of F or FF (the latter indicating dishonesty) in the course.

Cheating

Cheating is defined as follows: (a) the unauthorized granting or receiving of aid during the prescribed period of a course-graded exercise: students may not consult written materials such as notes or books, may not look at the paper of another student, nor consult orally with any other student taking the same test; (b) asking another person to take an examination in his/her place; (c) taking an examination for or in place of another student; (d) stealing visual concepts, such as drawings, sketches, diagrams, musical programs and scores, graphs, maps, etc., and presenting them as one’s own; (e) stealing, borrowing, buying, or disseminating tests, answer keys or other examination material except as officially authorized, research papers, creative papers, speeches, other graded assignments, etc. (f) Stealing or copying of computer programs and presenting them as one’s own. Such stealing includes the use of another student’s program, as obtained from the magnetic media or interactive terminals or from cards, print-out paper, etc.

Penalties for Academic Dishonesty:
Penalties for academic dishonesty will depend on the seriousness of the offense and may include assignment of an “F” or a numerical value of zero on the subject paper, lab report, etc., an “F” or an “FF” grade (the latter indicating academic dishonesty) in the course, suspension or expulsion from the University. A student who receives an “FF” grade may not use the university’s Grade Forgiveness Policy if the course is subsequently repeated. An “FF” grade assigned to indicate academic dishonesty is reflected only on internal records and prevents the student from repeating the course using the Grade Forgiveness Policy. If a student who has been accused of academic dishonesty drops the course, the student’s registration in the course may be reinstated until the issue is resolved. (NOTE: A student who is suspected of cheating may not drop a course to avoid a penalty. If the student drops a course after having cheated, the university may reinstate him or her until the case is adjudicated and, if appropriate, the penalty determined. However, even if the student is not reinstated in the course, disciplinary action may be pursued if cheating is suspected and the “W” grade may be changed to an FF, F, or other grade depending on the ultimate resolution of the disciplinary process. This includes any instance of cheating that is not detected by the instructor until after the student has dropped the course. The ultimate penalty may be an FF or an F in the course, or other action.) Procedures for student notification and the option of appeal concerning the academic dishonesty remain with the instructor and/or department chair. (See Procedures for Alleged Academic Dishonesty or Disruption of Academic Process.) Notice that a student has been dismissed for reasons of academic dishonesty will be reflected on the student’s transcript with the formal notation: Dismissed for Academic Dishonesty.

For the first “FF” recorded in a student’s USF academic record, the student will receive a letter from the Dean of Undergraduate Studies informing him or her of being placed on “Academic Dishonesty Warning” for the remainder of enrollment at USF and of appeal rights for the “FF” grade. Students with any “FF” grade on record will not be eligible for honors at graduation.

For the second “FF” recorded, the student will be suspended for one full semester and readmitted only after writing a clear statement indicating remorse, understanding of the seriousness of the offense, and understanding of the importance of integrity in all areas, including academic work. A letter informing him or her of this action and appeal rights will be sent from the Dean of Undergraduate Studies.

For the third “FF” recorded, the student will be permanently dismissed from the university for violations of academic integrity and with notice of that dismissal as a part of the formal record and transcript.

Note that the maximum penalty for receipt of any “FF” grade may be permanent dismissal from the university for violations of academic integrity and with a notice of that dismissal as a part of the student’s formal record and transcript.

The following penalties are generally assigned in cases when the maximum penalty is not appropriate.

  1. For observation of or exchanging test information with other students during the course of a classroom test, the students who receive or give such information may receive an “F” with a numerical value of zero on the test, and the “F” shall be used to determine the final course grade. It is the option of the instructor to fail the student in the course and assign and “F” or “FF” grade for the course.

  2. For the use of any prohibited device, such as a cheat sheet, recording, calculator if forbidden on exam, etc., during the course of a classroom test to assist the student or other students, the student using such prohibited device may receive an “F” or “FF” in the course.

  3. For the use of another student, a stand-in, to take an examination for the enrolled student, it is suggested that the enrolled student receive an “F” or “FF” in the course and be suspended from school for one year and that the stand-in, if a University student, be suspended from school for one year.

  4. For stealing, borrowing, or buying of research papers, creative works, speeches or tests and other exam materials, or other graded assignments, or the dissemination of such materials, or the manipulation of recorded grades in a grade book or other class records, the student, if enrolled in the course, may receive an “F” or “FF” in the course and may be expelled from the University.

  5. It is suggested that students who plagiarize or receive or give stolen computer programs receive an “F” with a numerical value of zero on the assignment, program or programs, and the “F” be used to determine the final course grade. It is the option of the instructor to fail the student in the course and assign and “F” or “FF” grade for the course.

Disruption of Academic Process

Disruption of academic process is defined as the act or words of a student in a classroom or teaching environment which in the reasonable estimation of a faculty member: (a) directs attention from the academic matters at hand, such as noisy distractions; persistent, disrespectful or abusive interruptions of lecture, exam or academic discussions, or (b) presents a danger to the health, safety or well being of the faculty member or students.

Punishment Guidelines for Disruption of Academic Process:
Punishments for disruption of academic process will depend on the seriousness of the disruption and will range from a private verbal reprimand to dismissal from class with a final grade of “W,” if the student is passing the course, shown on the student record. If the student is not passing, a grade of “F” will be shown on the student record. Particularly serious instances of disruption or the academic process may result in suspension or permanent expulsion from the University.

Hearings

Emergency Hearings. An expedited emergency hearing may be held before an academic administrator appointed by the dean or by the appointed academic committee in cases that involve the safety, health or welfare of any student or staff member.


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Office of Undergraduate Studies
Effective Date: Semester I, 2006

http://www.ugs.usf.edu/catalogs/0607/stpgsrrp.htm